Legal Business

Sponsored chambers briefing: Hybrid counsel – powered by commercial and chancery expertise

Sponsored chambers briefing: Hybrid counsel – powered by commercial and chancery expertise

Serle Court’s chief executive argues that the blending of chancery and commercial is about seeing legal issues from the client’s point of view

Eighteen months on from the launch of the Business and Property Courts in England and Wales, it is interesting to reflect on what this change means. Not only in terms of maintaining the UK’s lead as the best place in the world for resolving commercial disputes but also for the increasingly artificial distinction between chancery and commercial disputes – now seeing business and legal issues the way our clients do. The new structure, bringing together all the various specialist commercial courts under one judicial roof, was intended to make it easier for international and domestic clients to understand the structure of the High Court in England and Wales. Our commercial courts have belatedly caught up with the realities of commercial life in the 21st century; we know from speaking to our business clients that they do not categorise their issues distinctly as either chancery or commercial. Instead they see ‘problems’ for which they require ‘solutions’. Lawyers may benefit from seeing things from this perspective too.