Disputes perspectives: Adrian Chopin

Disputes perspectives: Adrian Chopin

When I was nine years old, an elderly relative told me I should consider being a lawyer because I was an argumentative brat. On that flimsy basis I studied law with German law. For my first year, I hated the subject – everything had come easily to me at school but this new thing required a lot of effort. I nearly gave up. At some point I had one of those moments that still makes me wince, but that nevertheless shaped my life. I was sitting on the floor of my room alone, pre-loading on vodka and listening to Pink Floyd’s Time when I had a moment of white panic that I was going to achieve nothing with my life. I ended up learning that the surest way to start to enjoy something is to get good at it, which is usually the reward of a tonne of hard work. I ended up loving my law degree. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Adrian Chopin”

Disputes perspectives: Kate Davies KC

Disputes perspectives: Kate Davies KC

I didn’t really decide to be a lawyer, the law chose me. I went to a wedding and sat next to a very nice man. He turned out to be a partner in a law firm and we talked career options all night. He gave me his business card and said to call him. I did, and was invited to meet some people. Entirely unbeknownst to me, it was a trainee selection day. I had no idea what I was doing, but I spent a day taking part in various team and individual exercises. At the end of the day the senior partner handed me a brown envelope. I asked what it was and he said, ‘a training contract’. I had to phone a friend to ask what that was. I hadn’t done a day of study in the law, but they paid for me to go to law school. I found my calling and the rest is history. Thank you, Miles. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Kate Davies KC”

Disputes perspectives: Sherina Petit

Disputes perspectives: Sherina Petit

I am the third generation in my family to have taken up law, following in the footsteps of my grandfather and father. My father was a partner at one of the top law firms in Mumbai and some of my best memories are of sitting in his office during school summer holidays, listening to him advising clients and watching with awe as they would listen. In my eyes no-one was smarter than my father, who clearly had the attention of every client. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Sherina Petit”

Energy perspectives: David Bone

Energy perspectives: David Bone

What made you decide to become a lawyer and, once you’d made that decision, why energy?

I decided to become a lawyer in my early teens, through watching courtroom dramas on TV. As it turned out, however, I have only appeared in court once and that was sitting on the bench (another story!). Becoming a renewable energy lawyer was somewhat fortuitous. I had been doing fairly high-value commercial property work for a number of years, and a developer who had worked on early wind farms in Cornwall and Wales wanted to try and develop the first ones in Scotland. He asked his English lawyer who to use and they recommended a large Scottish law firm. After a short period, the developer decided that firm wasn’t showing enough interest in his work so turned to someone in Scotland he had done a joint venture with and asked him. I was that company’s lawyer and I was recommended. The developer made an appointment, ca+me into my office and asked (this was 1993) if I knew anything about wind farms. Being honest, I said no. He then asked if I would be interested in learning, and I said it sounded fascinating. The rest is history and 30 years on I am still learning! Continue reading “Energy perspectives: David Bone”

Energy perspectives: Clare Burgess

Energy perspectives: Clare Burgess

What made you decide to become a lawyer and why did you choose to go into infrastructure transactions?

I chose to study law with thoughts of becoming a barrister. While at university I was introduced to City law firms through the milk rounds and was drawn to the emphasis on working as a team, opportunities to work on headline deals, international secondment opportunities… and the law school grants! Continue reading “Energy perspectives: Clare Burgess”

Energy perspectives: Maria Connolly

Energy perspectives: Maria Connolly

What made you decide to become a lawyer and, once you’d made that decision, why energy?

I chose to do law at university as I felt it would be a good base for a future career choice, whether that was law or otherwise. Even the prospect of doing a degree was pretty daunting at first, as the first in a generation to do so. However, I genuinely loved it, particularly all things land law, and it was therefore a natural career choice for me to secure a training contract – which was with TLT!  Continue reading “Energy perspectives: Maria Connolly”

Private Client perspectives: Ayesha Vardag

Private Client perspectives: Ayesha Vardag

What made you decide to become a lawyer and, once you’d made that decision, why did you choose family law?

I wanted to be an actress, a journalist or a novelist, not a lawyer at all. I got interested in law spending time with my lawyer aunt in New York during my gap year, but still went to Cambridge to read English Lit. But I found that more of a crash course than an exploration, and felt that I might as well switch to the intellectual attractions of law. After a term I realised that studying law is terribly dull, it was the last thing I wanted as a career and I didn’t apply for any law jobs. I went straight to the BBC when I graduated. But then a scholarship that I’d forgotten I’d even applied for came through to study for a masters in European law in the French-speaking university in Brussels. I remember at the time my boyfriend told me: ‘Just because you get an opportunity it doesn’t mean you have to take it.’ But the BBC was supportive and I wanted the voyage of discovery offered by this exciting international frolic. Continue reading “Private Client perspectives: Ayesha Vardag”

Private Client perspectives: Ashley Crossley

Private Client perspectives: Ashley Crossley

What made you decide to become a lawyer and why private client?

My parents divorced at an early age, and I became very interested in how the law dealt with people and their relationships. That grew into an interest in law generally and how it could be used to solve problems. Having an interest in people and problem-solving meant private client work was a natural choice for me. It combines dealing with individuals’ personal issues, when they are often in a stressful or difficult situation, with helping solve their problems for them so they can move forward. Private client just seemed a natural and interesting choice for me. Continue reading “Private Client perspectives: Ashley Crossley”

Private Client perspectives: Sandra Davis

Private Client perspectives: Sandra Davis

What made you decide to become a lawyer and why practise family law?

I’m naturally a problem solver, and I’ve always wanted to make a difference. Family law makes a real difference to people’s lives. We can help make a bad situation better, create calm in an emotional storm, and save children from the turmoil by early intervention. I’m motivated by providing solutions that are creative, rather than those that are formulaic. Continue reading “Private Client perspectives: Sandra Davis”