Disputes perspectives: Gaby Dosanjh-Pahil

Disputes perspectives: Gaby Dosanjh-Pahil

I’ve always wanted to be a barrister, since before I can remember. There was no particular event or anything, I just always knew. I must have seen something on TV or the news perhaps. It was easy for me, because once you know what you want to do, it’s easy to follow that path.

I’ve never been an outgoing, loud person. Although I have married my complete opposite! I was the youngest of three children, and a girl with two older brothers, so I was always wrapped up in cotton wool. But I’m quietly confident. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Gaby Dosanjh-Pahil”

Virtual reality

Virtual reality

The health of the English and Welsh court system has long been a cause for genuine concern. Over the last decade, there have been anxieties over the diminishing desirability of a judicial role, not least due to a chronic lack of governmental funding that has resulted in salaries comparatively paltry to private practice positions.

This has been amplified by the introduction of the Judicial Attitudes Survey (JAS), which has given judges the platform to publicly lay out their grievances since 2014. It produced some shocking results. The 2016 edition revealed that nearly half (47%) of High Court judges were considering leaving the judiciary, alongside 41% of Court of Appeal judges and 40% of Circuit judges. A majority of judges (76%), felt they had experienced a deterioration in their working conditions since 2014, with 43% stating that the maintenance of their building was poor. Continue reading “Virtual reality”

Written in the stars: the up-and-coming generation on the future of disputes

Written in the stars: the up-and-coming generation on the future of disputes

‘We’re changing law firms just through being who we are and by the different perspectives that we bring,’ Linklaters counsel Jacqueline Chaplin tells Legal Business.

With every generation of disputes practitioners come new perspectives and an enthusiasm to leave a mark on the practice. And, in the past year, firms have been forced to adapt to significant business change in a way that – were they undisturbed by the pandemic – they may have tiptoed around implementing for years. Now, disputes practices have the opportunity to maintain the momentum for modernisation and embrace different perspectives and new challenges. Continue reading “Written in the stars: the up-and-coming generation on the future of disputes”

Disputes perspectives: Tony Singla QC

Disputes perspectives: Tony Singla QC

I’m the youngest of three children. My brother and sister both read law at university, and have become lawyers themselves. My sister is a general counsel, and my brother is a silk. They’re both older than me, and when it came to applying to university, there wasn’t much choice on my part! I benefited a lot from their revision notes…

I briefly contemplated a career in the City, and I did an internship at Goldman Sachs in 2005. It was useful in the sense that it confirmed that I did want to pursue a career in the law. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Tony Singla QC”

Disputes perspectives: Tracey Dovaston

Disputes perspectives: Tracey Dovaston

I’d like to say becoming a lawyer was a very well-thought-out decision in my teenage years, but it wasn’t. I recall taking a career aptitude test at school, and it was one of the few professions I’d actually heard of. Law sounded interesting, and I’ve always enjoyed the legal wrangling in various TV shows. Showing my age, it included the less esoteric ones at the time, like LA Law in the late 80s and early 90s.

I picked Herbert Smith. I applied to a number of places, but I had heard partner Lawrence Collins, now Lord Collins of Mapesbury, speak at a careers event at university. Herbert Smith was well-known as a preeminent litigation firm and so I thought that was where I wanted to go. I wrote to him directly. I didn’t think it would make any difference, but it did. When I started, I was a trainee in his litigation department. I had an opportunity to work with him first hand, and he supported me in the early stages of my career. Continue reading “Disputes perspectives: Tracey Dovaston”

Disputes Yearbook – online PDF

Disputes Yearbook – online PDF

While much of the country works from home we are providing an additional online option for you to access your copy of the Disputes Yearbook 2021. Please see below for a link to an online pdf of the Disputes Yearbook 2021. This will only be accessible to subscribers. Please make sure you are logged into the site to see the link.

Legal Business subscribers will be receiving their physical copies of the Disputes Yearbook with Legal Business circulation.

Continue reading “Disputes Yearbook – online PDF”

Access your print copy online – LB301

Access your print copy online – LB301

While much of the country works from home we are providing more options for you to access your copy of Legal Business. Please see below for links to a limited version followed by a complete version. The complete version is only accessible to subscribers. Please make sure you are logged into the site to see the link.

Limited version Continue reading “Access your print copy online – LB301”

Global London: Turbulence expected

Global London: Turbulence expected

Overview: Flying hiatus

Covid-19 has intensified the divide between the Global London firms that have really taken off and those that remain grounded

Focus: Cooley

Focus: Simpson Thacher & Bartlett

Main table

Non-US firms in London: On standby

Five years ago, partners at European firms’ London offices voiced their fears over the possibility of the UK leaving the EU. What happens now this is reality?

The Last Word: Law in a time of Covid

To mark the launch of our 2021 Global London report, we asked senior figures at leading US firms for their thoughts

Sponsored briefing: Paul Hastings – Running a people business

London chair Arun Birla discusses maintaining the personal touch in a time of Zoom fatigue

Global London: Flying hiatus

Global London: Flying hiatus

While no two years are ever quite the same in the world of Legal Business’ Global London report, the story can usually be summed up as one of bifurcation. It tells of the dynamic high-flyers and those foreign firms whose London practices have yet to take off the ground.

For years there has also been a relative predictability in the worry lists of City leaders of non-UK law firms – concerns around London’s place on the world financial stage post-Brexit, an overdue downturn and the perennial challenge of keeping a grip on market share in an ever-more competitive arena. Continue reading “Global London: Flying hiatus”