Legal Business

Adviser review: Eversheds and Hill Dickinson win spots on Metro Bank’s lending and securities panel

Adviser review: Eversheds and Hill Dickinson win spots on Metro Bank’s lending and securities panel

Eversheds and Hill Dickinson have been newly appointed to Metro Bank’s lending and securities panel alongside 12 others, following the bank’s first review since 2012.

The tender process, which began in June 2014 and was finalised in early November, has resulted in 14 firms being named on the new roster.

The full list of successful firms is: Blake Morgan, Bircham Dyson Bell, Breeze & Wyles, Cripps, EMW, Eversheds, Herrington & Carmichael, Hill Dickinson, Howard Kennedy, Hugh James, Lawrence Stephens, MW Solicitors, Philip Ross and Pitmans.

The bank’s general counsel Sally-Ann James commented: ‘We’re pleased to announce the results of our lending and securities panel review, following a rigorous selection process. We look forward to working closely with the refreshed panel going forward.’

The lending and securities panel is one of four panels that Metro Bank has in place for external counsel. The other three are commercial, property and employment, however lending and securities is the largest.

Blake Morgan is the only firm on the lending and securities panel to sit on another, with places on both commercial and property. The full list for each panel is:

Commercial panel

Blake Morgan

Wragge Lawrence Graham & Co

DWF

Addleshaw Goddard

King & Spalding

Property panel

Blake Morgan

Wragge Lawrence Graham & Co

Dentons

Employment panel

Travers Smith

Dentons

kathryn.mccann@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

‘A very satisfactory outcome’: Hill Dickinson wins payment in ‘Alexandros T’ case

‘A very satisfactory outcome’: Hill Dickinson wins payment in ‘Alexandros T’ case

The Court of Appeal has handed down judgment on the long-running litigation between Starlight Shipping versus Hill Dickinson, a host of insurance companies, and others, allowing defendants Hill Dickinson and insurance services company Charles Taylor Adjusting to recover damages of £225,000 and £100,000 respectively and giving a 60% interim payment.

The landmark case dubbed ‘Alexandros T’ arose after the Starlight Shipping Company launched litigation against insurers Alliance Marine and Aviation, Royal Sun and Alliance, General Insurance, Rembrandt Insurance and Brit, after its vessel Alexandros T was lost in 2006. While the case was settled in 2008, in 2011 Starlight brought another lawsuit against the insurers, their advisors and a number of employees in Greece, which alleged that the defendants had fabricated false evidence and bribed key witnesses in the English proceedings.

In the latest judgment, the Court of Appeal dismissed issues remitted to it by the Supreme Court, and that following the Supreme Court’s decision, the English proceedings were not subject to a stay under Articles 27 and 28 of the Judgments Regulation. In the recent ruling, the Hill Dickinson parties sought an interim payment equalising approximately 60% of the costs incurred to date by them in the Greek proceedings of £225,000. It also allows for the monies to be recovered by the insurers on behalf of and for Hill Dickinson.

In the previous settlement regarding the loss of the vessel in 2006, the shipping company was paid the total value of the claim but no judgement was made. This settlement was subject to English law and contained an exclusive English jurisdiction agreement.

Now, the English court has found that the dispute brought in Greece was in breach of the original agreement, and affirmed the right under English law of a party to a contract to obtain damages from the other contracting party if it brings proceedings in tort in another member state in breach of an express jurisdiction clause.

Mayer Brown advised Hill Dickinson, instructing David Bailey QC and Jocelin Gale of 7KBW. Bailey told Legal Business: ‘It is a very satisfactory outcome for Hill Dickinson.’

But despite the outcome, the shipping company may still bring forward its case in Greece that alleges that law firm Hill Dickinson, other lawyers, and the insurers were involved in a wider conspiracy that created false evidence at the time of the original settlements.

Bailey added that its defence has been solid so far and is in place if anything should take place in Greece.

Clyde & Co represented insurers Alliance Marine and Aviation Insurance, Royal and Sun Alliance Insurance, General Insurance and Rembrandt Insurance, and instructed Mark Howard QC and Tony Singla of Brick Court Chambers.

Norton Rose Fulbright advised Brit UW and the underwriting members of the Lloyd’s syndicate, alongside Steven Gee QC and Tom Whitehead of Stone Chambers.

Bentleys, Stokes & Lowless also advised on the case alongside Stephen Cogley QC and Christopher Jay of Quadrant Chambers.

Legal Business

Trucking ahead – King & Spalding, Hill Dickinson and Minter Ellison advise on £280m Eddie Stobart majority stake sale

Trucking ahead – King & Spalding, Hill Dickinson and Minter Ellison advise on £280m Eddie Stobart majority stake sale

Rare in the transport world for having its own television show, King & Spalding, Hill Dickinson and Minter Ellison have secured roles on the £280m sale of a majority stake in iconic UK haulage company Eddie Stobart, announced this week.

The sale by the Stobart Group to a group led by chief operating officer William Stobart, sees US top 40 Global 100 firm King & Spalding advise Stobart’s financial backers, DouglasBay Capital.

King & Spalding’s London team was led by corporate partner William Charnley, former managing partner of McDermott Will & Emery’s London office, who joined Mayer Brown in 2007 and later King & Spalding in 2012 as part of a series of lateral hires to build up its City capability. The deal team includes tax partner Kevin Conway and employment partner Pulina Whitaker.

Under the terms of the deal the Stobart Group will release 51% of holding company Eddie Stobart Logistics, comprising of £195.6m in cash, £44.1m in shares and around $41.1m in debt, allowing the company to repay some debt and return capital to shareholders.

Hill Dickinson advised long-standing client the Stobart Group, with a team led by Jonathan Brown. Brown previously advised the Stobart Group on its acquisition of James Irlam & Son for £60m in 2008.

William Stobart is being advised by Minter Ellison’s London corporate M&A partner Michael Wallin.

The Eddie Stobart brand began with individually named green trucks and drivers that must wave and honk their horn if waved to, and has grown to encompass its own Channel 5 television show, Trucks and Trailers.

However, the Stobart Group is reported by the Financial Times to be diversifying away from road haulage, and has widened its portfolio with acquisitions including Southend Airport in 2008 for £21m, and Carlisle Lake District Airport a year later for £9.9m. Hill Dickinson led by Brown advised the group on both those acquisitions. The group also operates a rail freight operation under the name of Stobart Rail.

Last year the group announced it would launch a law firm, One Legal, after being granted alternative business structure status by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. The company also offers its clients direct access to a network of barristers for fixed fee.

david.stevenson@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

LLP latest: Speechly points to owed client fees for fall in profits as Ashurst and Hill Dicks also post profit drop

LLP latest: Speechly points to owed client fees for fall in profits as Ashurst and Hill Dicks also post profit drop

Private-client focused Speechly Bircham has become one of the latest LB100 firm to post its limited liability partnership (LLP) accounts at Companies House, blaming its near-double digit drop in profits on fees due from one client despite overall cash collection having improved.

The top 60 firm, which revealed a broadly flat revenue, down 0.9% to £57m from £57.6m for the 2012/13 financial year, saw a 9% pre-tax profit slide to £18.4m from £20.1m.

Describing the last financial year as one of ‘consolidation’ after a period of expansion and the opening of overseas offices in Zurich and Luxembourg, the firm said profits were ‘adversely impacted by a significant provision made in respect of fees owing by one client of the firm,’ relating to the period before 1 May 2012.

Wages and salaries paid out reduced from £17m to £16.4m, while the average number of fee earners dropped to 157 from 165. Profit allocated to the member with the highest entitlement was £376,000 compared to £405,000 the previous year. Average profit per full equity member was also down to £286,000 from £309,000 during the 2011/12 financial year.

The firm’s bank loans and overdrafts reduced substantially to £5.4m from £9.2m – a 41% reduction which it said ‘reflects the improved focus on cash collections. With modern offices and good IT systems we have limited capital expenditure requirements over the next few years.’

The firm in November opened an office in Paris with an 11-strong team focused on private wealth tax planning and corporate and litigation services to private clients, private equity investors and corporates.

However, the firm also abandoned merger talks with fellow private client firm Withers last summer – a union that was seen as more advantageous to the smaller Speechly than Withers due to the considerable gap in underlying profitability between the pair.

Elsewhere, Ashurst’s LLP filings for the 2012/13 year last week revealed that the firm’s net funds reduced considerably from £20.9m to £6.9m during that period, while its cash at the bank and in hand also fell by 66% from £21.2m to £7.2m in 2013.

During the year, the group entered into finance leases and other financing transactions in respect of assets with a total value at inception of £140,000 from £35,000 in 2012.

The top-20 firm, which merged with Blake Dawson last year, officially tying up with what has been rebranded Ashurst Australia in November, saw its turnover to April 2013 increase marginally from £321m to £323m as its overall profits fell by 3.7% to £97.9m from £101.7m.

Overall operating costs at the firm increased by 4.1% from £214.8m to £223.5m, while staff costs also grew from £137.6m to £143.9m between 2012 and 2013.

Ashurst’s highest paid member took home 11% less in 2013, receiving £977,000 compared to £1.1m in 2012.

Meanwhile, Hill Dickinson’s LLP accounts for 2012/13 also last week stated that it had been a year of strong performances from the top 35 firm’s marine and health business groups, offset by the ‘continued impact of the UK economy for commercial legal services and also price pressure in certain sectors’.

Turnover increased by 2.2% to £113m, but profit before members’ remuneration fell by 13.4% to £27m.

The firm stated that an element of this decrease related to ‘significant actions taken by the board between February and April 2013 as it implemented a full review of client service line and geographic reach.

‘The outcome of this review necessitated a reorganisation and reduction of headcount and associated overhead expenditure,’ the LLP report concludes, adding, ‘The full benefit of this review will be most strongly evident in our anticipated financial performance for the year ending 30 April 2015 although it will also contribute significantly in the current financial year.’

Hill Dickinson announced in April 2013 that it would be reviewing jobs ‘in response to the prevailing market conditions’ and in July announced a total of 83 job losses, including 14 partners and 69 employees – 44 of which are leaving on a voluntary basis.

The news was confirmed shortly after the firm’s announcement that it had sold its Chester office to Midlands firm Knights Solicitors.

jaishree.kalia@legalease.co.uk

sarah.downey@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

Hill Dickinson sees H1 revenues up 6% following summer cash call

Hill Dickinson sees H1 revenues up 6% following summer cash call

Top-40 LB100 firm Hill Dickinson has posted a half year increase in revenues from £54.9m from £51.9m this time last year, after asking members to increase their capital contributions during the summer.

The 520-lawyer firm issued a £2.8m cash call in August after a year of heavy investment, including opening an office in Monte Carlo and Hong Kong. The firm then underwent a strategic review earlier this year which included the sale of its Chester office in July to Knights Solicitors and announcing 83 redundancies.

‘The last six months have seen a significant re-alignment of the business to ensure our continued success in a market which, despite signs of improvement, continues to provide challenges,’ said managing partner Peter Jackson.

‘It is really pleasing to see that this is clearly resulting in growth which allows us to continue to invest in the firm for its future success. It is also interesting to see particularly strong results in areas which reflect the growing increase in business confidence across the country. Over the next 12 months we will continue to invest in our people, especially nurturing new talent and continuing to deliver exceptional results for our clients,’ he added.

For the 2012-13 financial year, despitye a marginal increase in turnover to £112.8m, Hill Dickinson saw both its profit per lawyer and profit per equity partner figure fall by 15% – at £33,000 and £264,000 respectively. The firm’s half year results come amid other UK firms posting similarly optimistic figures, with DWF leading the pack with a revenue increase of 57.5% to £93.6m, largely due to the firm’s appetite for mergers.

david.stevenson@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

Asia round-up: DLA loses former Singapore head..again.. as Hill Dicks launches in Hong Kong

Asia round-up: DLA loses former Singapore head..again.. as Hill Dicks launches in Hong Kong

With all eyes trained on Asia the office fall outs and launches have been throw into far sharper relief. Losing one former office head could be said to be an accident but DLA Piper’s loss in Singapore of its second former managing partner (MP), Matthew Glynn, is starting to look like trouble, after ex MP Martin David left in May to join Ince & Co. The departure also follows the resignation last August of disputes partner Justyn Jagger for local firm Stamford law.

Glynn, who led the Singapore office for a relatively short period between June 2011 and February this year, was also head of the firm’s Asia intellectual property and technology group.

Incumbent Singapore managing partner John Goulios, who took over from Glynn in February, said: ‘I can confirm the departure of Matt Glynn from our Singapore office – we wish Matt all the best in his new endeavours. DLA Piper is committed to the strategic growth of our Singapore office and with the onset of the economic community in ASEAN in 2015, Singapore and Southeast Asia are of crucial importance to our firm.’

It is the wrong time to be in a weakened position in Singapore, as the Southeast Asian Republic continues to attract the global legal elite. Simmons & Simmons in May opened an office in a year that has also seen Magic Circle firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer reverse its decision five years ago to shut shop in the jurisdiction. Its Singapore offering includes corporate heavyweight Stephen Revell, who heads the firm’s global capital markets practice and Gavin MacLaren, a lateral hire from Allens Arthur Robinson where he led the Australian firm’s Southeast Asian practice from Singapore for many years.

Elsewhere, Hill Dickinson, already a presence in Singapore, has formally announced that it is to launch in Hong Kong in October. Speaking to Legal Business recently, Jackson said he had no intention of challenging the Magic Circle and will enter the market on a marine platform that seems to have worked well for the firm thus far.

The firm will be launching in Hong Kong in association with a local firm after it received regulatory approval from the Law Society of Hong Kong. Due to a confidentiality agreement the local firm cannot be named until the association is finalised. Hill Dickinson will be relocating a partner from the UK to lead the new venture and head a team of four.

Peter Jackson said: ‘Working with the partners at Hill Dickinson we are making a series of strategic decisions to strengthen the firm’s position both nationally and globally. We submitted an application to the Law Society in Hong Kong in May after identifying a gap in the local market. Our Singapore office has performed extremely well and we believe we can replicate this success in Hong Kong.’

Meanwhile, Vinson & Elkins continues to deal with the fallout of its decision to shut its Shanghai office. China co-head David Blumental is relocating to the firm’s Hong Kong office, while his opposite number, Jay Kolb, will now be based in Beijing.

Earlier this month Vinson & Elkins Shanghai energy specialist Tju Liang Chua left the firm to join US rival Sidley Austin in Singapore.

david.stevenson@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

Investment costs: Hill Dickinson partners vote through £2.8m cash call

Investment costs: Hill Dickinson partners vote through £2.8m cash call

It’s been a tough year for national firm Hill Dickinson. With both profit per lawyer and profit per equity partner taking a tumble of 15% – each at £33,000 and £264,000 respectively – and recent partner and staff redundancies matching others struggling in a turbulent market, the 200-year old firm has confirmed that it has issued a £2.8m cash call to partners to boost the balance sheet due to what managing partner Peter Jackson says was down to a year of heavy investment.

Hefty spending in the last 18 months includes the national firm’s launch of a new office led by resident partner David Reardon in Monte Carlo in March to boost its shipping and yacht practice. It also added a 30-strong defendant insurance team from DLA Piper’s Sheffield and Manchester offices earlier in the year, and invested in new premises at London’s Broadgate Tower for its City team in 2012.

Now, fixed-share and full equity partners will contribute a further £1,000 per equity point while a one-off contribution of £1,000 currently made by salaried partners will continue. Operating a modified lockstep ranging between 28-70 points, movement up the ladder is merit-based while performance is reviewed annually. Partners can move a maximum of six points up the equity ladder in a given year.

Jackson attributes the heavy investment made this year as part of a strategy that has caused the firm to struggle with profit levels this year. ‘I like to call it further investment. Strangely nobody else does. Internally, nobody likes paying more money out but the partners recognise that we’ve invested in a number of areas over the last 18 months and we’ve got to be able to continue that. That’s recognition on their part that doing business requires funding and they’ve done that.’

Jackson confirmed that the decision to increase capital was made by the partnership through a vote and not insisted on by lenders. ‘This is not me, senior partners and the Board thinking “we have to put money in”,’ he said. ‘The members have to have all the facts – strategy, investment, financials, presence in the marketplace, what we’re doing next and take a view – and they have.’

‘We’ve not seen people up in arms,’ he added. ‘There’s recognition also that our contributions were below average for firms of our size, status and in the marketplace.’

The 64-equity partner firm generated revenues of £112.8m this year – a marginal 2% increase while the 22% leap in profit per lawyer in 2011/12 stands starkly against the 15% decrease last year.

Last month the firm, following an announcement in April that it would be reviewing jobs ‘in response to the prevailing market conditions’ announced a total of 83 job losses, including 14 partners and 69 employees – 44 of which are leaving on a voluntary basis.

The news was confirmed shortly after the firm had announced it has sold its Chester office to Midlands firm Knights Solicitors for an undisclosed sum.

Sarah.downey@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

Redundancy watch: DWF, Hill Dickinson and Taylor Wessing all confirm job cuts

Redundancy watch: DWF, Hill Dickinson and Taylor Wessing all confirm job cuts

The stream of UK law firm job cuts continues apace as DWF, Hill Dickinson and Taylor Wessing have today (30 July) confirmed that recent redundancy consultations have resulted multiple job losses.

DWF, having completed five mergers in less than 18 months and with a remarkable 84% increase in turnover to £188m, has become one of the most closely watched national practices in the legal market of late. The expansion has led to some significant streamlining of the business however and the firm has confirmed to Legal Business it has cut 38 staff from its ranks following redundancy consultations that began in May.

‘Following a recent restructure, DWF has had a net reduction of 38 roles across the practice groups,’ said a firm statement. The firm would neither specify which offices the job cuts have affected nor which roles.

The redundancies come after DWF announced a review of 80 roles in May, while two months previous to that the firm placed 99 jobs under threat after its run of five acquisitions – and having taken on the heavy load of 419 staff from the collapsing Cobbetts.

DWF also confirmed in May that the redundancy consultation would affect fee-earners and support staff at the firm’s Manchester, Coventry, Teesside and London bases, while restructuring at the Birmingham office was completed with two exiting the office and three others finding alternative roles.

Meanwhile Hill Dickinson, following an announcement in April that it would be reviewing jobs ‘in response to the prevailing market conditions’ has announced a total of 83 job losses, including 14 partners and 69 employees – 44 of which are leaving on a voluntary basis.

The news was confirmed shortly after the firm had announced it has sold its Chester office to Midlands firm Knights Solicitors for an undisclosed sum. The acquisition is a first for the James Caan-led Knights following the private equity investment it received from Hamilton Bradshaw in June 2012.

The cuts are a surprise given Hill Dickinson has averaged 10% revenue growth over the last five years and posted a 22% rise in profit per lawyer in 2011/12.

Senior partner David Wareing said: ‘This has been a sensitive time for all involved and we have done our utmost to conduct a professional and thorough consultation process with our staff throughout.

‘We have a strong and sustainable business and indeed many of our teams recorded revenue growth in the last financial year. Inevitably however, we have been affected like all our competitors by the difficult trading conditions which presently exist in our regional centres and accordingly it has been necessary for us to proactively manage the business to ensure the stability of the firm as a whole and to enable us to continue to further invest in the business in the future.’

In the City, Taylor Wessing, having enjoyed modest financial growth this year with UK revenue growing 4% to £104.5m, has confirmed 22 secretaries will be made redundant. This was originally anticipated to be 26 out of a consultation of 96 secretarial roles which began in June.

The firm said the consultation was part of a restructure of its secretarial resource rather than simply a headcount reduction exercise. It also expects a new secretarial support model to improve workplace efficiency with new secretarial services desk that will provide document services support to secretaries and fee-earners alike.

Finally, just four partners and eight staff at DLA Piper have decided to accept permanent relocation from its now closed Glasgow office to Edinburgh. This follows a three-month trial period in which the 10 partners and 30 other staff could decide whether to make the move. DLA declined to comment.

The latest cuts by Taylor Wessing, DLA Piper, DWF, and Hill Dickinson are a string of many across major UK firms under pressure to maintain profit levels, with firms such as Berwin Leighton Paisner and Eversheds both confirming job cuts this year.

sarah.downey@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

UK financial roll call: Wragge & Co, Hill Dicks, Watson Farley and Trowers reveal 2012/13 numbers

The UK top 100 financial roll call has seen Wragge & Co, Watson, Farley & Williams, Trowers & Hamlins and Hill Dickinson unveil their financial results for 2012/13, with a number suffering a significant dent in their profit figures.

Watson Farley broke through the £100m revenue barrier, reporting a firm-wide increase of 2% to £102.1m, up on last year’s £99.8m. However, PEP has dropped by 13% to £388,000 from £446,000 in 2012.

The 339-lawyer firm attributed both the rise in revenue and the drop in profit to its Hong Kong launch in March 2012 followed by an opening in Frankfurt in January of this year, together with the six lateral partner hires the firm made last year.

Watson Farley managing partner Michael Greville said: ‘We are confident that these investments driven by client demand will generate sustained growth for the business. A strong pipeline of work coming in across all of our offices already bodes well for 2013.’

Elsewhere, top 30 Birmingham headquartered Wragge & Co today announced an increase in both profit and turnover – the only one of the four firms to do so. Turnover was up by 2% to £120.5m and PEP rose by 3% to £339,000, with overall profit at the firm up by 5.5% from £38.1m to £40.2m.

At 332-lawyer firm Trowers & Hamlin, however, global net profit slid by 21% from 20.1m in 2011/12 to 15.8m this year, with PEP down to £307,000 and revenue down to £78.3m. Property contributed to 43% of the firm’s revenue, followed by corporate (30%), litigation (18%) finance (6%) and the remainder spread across other practice areas.

The UK top 50 firm’s equity spread this year ranges from £165,000 at its lowest to £412,000 at its highest, down from £198,000 to £496,000 in 2011/12, while the number of partner globally is down from 56 to 52.

Also suffering a significant drop in PEP is top 30 UK firm Hill Dickinson, which saw its figure decrease by 15% to £264,000 from £312,000 in 2011/12, although revenues increased to £112.8m, up 2% on last year’s £110.1m.

Managing partner Peter Jackson has pointed to increased overheads and international expansion for the firm’s slump in profitability, including its launch in February this year of an office in Monte Carlo to boost its yacht and shipping practices.

jaishree.kalia@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

NHSLA unveils £400m panel as DAC and Hill Dicks win spots

NHSLA unveils £400m panel as DAC and Hill Dicks win spots

DAC Beachcroft, Kennedys, Hill Dickinson, Browne Jacobson and Weightmans are among 14 firms to have won places on the NHS Litigation Authority’s (NHSLA) expanded services legal panel, with a total legal spend of around £400m over four years.

The body that deals with claims from patients who have been harmed whilst under the care of the NHS today announced the conclusion of its two-month procurement process across three sub-panels: clinical liability; non-clinical liability; and regulatory, health and disciplinary (RHD).

The above-named firms stand out for winning a place on each of the three sub-panels. Also appointed to the clinical liability panel – which with an estimated annual legal spend of £70-80m is the most significant of the three – are Berrymans Lace Mawer; Bevan Brittan; Capsticks; Clyde & Co; Hempsons and Ward Hadaway.

Berrymans also won a second spot on the six-strong non-clinical liability panel with an estimated annual spend of between £10-15m.

The RHD panel, which has the smallest annual spend of between £2-5m, saw a second panel win for Capsticks; Hempsons and Ward Hadaway, alongside one time panel winners Field Fisher Waterhouse; Mills & Reeve and Morgan Cole.

The new contract, which went live on 28 May with a lifespan of four years, is based on fixed hourly rates, with firms providing ‘additional valued services’ to support the NHS, in an approach which is expected to deliver substantial savings.

According to the NHSLA, it has secured more competitive terms from the firms involved by running the procurement process across all 16 Department of Health organisations, which previously procured their own legal advice.

The firms will provide advice on health related issues including clinical and other negligence and specialist healthcare regulator advice to organisations including the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Professional Standards Authority and Public Health England.

NHSLA chief executive Catherine Dixon said: ‘We’re delighted to have secured what I am confident will be excellent quality legal services for the NHS at a price which ensures value for money.’

The NHSLA, which slashed its external advisers from 90 to 15 back in 2002, kicked off its tender process in March this year.

The number of firms on the clinical liability panel, last appointed in 2008, has increased from 10 to 11 while the organisation has reduced the number of firms on the non-clinical liability panel, which was last reviewed in 2009, from seven to six.

A complete list is as follows:

Clinical liability

  • Berrymans Lace Mawer
  • Bevan Brittan
  • Browne Jacobson
  • Capsticks
  • Clyde & Co
  • DAC Beachcroft
  • Hempsons
  • Hill Dickinson
  • Kennedys
  • Ward Hadaway
  • Weightmans

Non-clinical liability

  • Berrymans Lace Mawer
  • Browne Jacobson
  • DAC Beachcroft
  • Hill Dickinson
  • Kennedys
  • Weightmans

Regulatory, health and disciplinary

  • Browne Jacobson
  • Capsticks
  • DAC Beachcroft
  • Field Fisher Waterhouse
  • Hempsons
  • Hill Dickinson
  • Kennedys
  • Mills & Reeve
  • Morgan Cole
  • Ward Hadaway
  • Weightmans

The 15 organisations to benefit from these panels are: Care Quality Commission, Health Education England, Health Research Authority, Health and Social Care Information Centre, Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, Human Tissue Authority, Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, Monitor, NHS Blood and Transplant, NHS Commissioning Board, The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, NHS Litigation Authority, NHS Trust Development Authority, Professional Standards Authority, Public Health England.

francesca.fanshawe@legalease.co.uk