Legal Business

Osborne Clarke retracts bulk of outsourced staff four years after deal

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Osborne Clarke (OC) is set to withdraw the majority of its outsourced staff from provider Integreon and bring them back in-house four years after initially striking the deal.

The firm will transfer roughly 65 of the 75 support staff, who were first assigned to Integreon in 2009, back to its offices, with two jobs thought to be at risk. The original deal was intended to last for seven years.

Staff covered areas including IT, office services, learning and development, events, document services and client relationship management.

Under the new terms, OC and Integreon will continue to work together on back office functions, including business intelligence, information services and 24-hour helpline, but OC’s Bristol and Reading receptionists will move to rival outsourcer Mitie, which is already the provider for OC’s London hospitality services.

OC first started its consultation with affected staff last Friday, 22 March, which will determine the precise numbers to be transferred and is expected to last a month. Any changes are likely to come into effect on 1 May.

CEO and managing partner, Simon Beswick, said: ‘We remain firm believers in the shared services model and look forward to continuing to work in partnership with Integreon. After four years of working closely together, it was the right time to review our needs, which have changed so much since 2009.’

Bob Gogel, CEO of Integreon said: ‘Integreon continues to develop the shared services model and interest has increased, along with support for, the dedicated service model. Our onshore, near-shore and offshore strategy continues to fit with the model for legal services support outsourcing.’

Integreon has also struck contracts with CMS and Simmons & Simmons in the past.

francesca.fanshawe@legalease.co.uk

Legal Business

LB100 Osborne Clarke: From South West to West Coast

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Twenty years ago, Osborne Clarke (OC) had revenues of £11.4m and an average PEP of £97,000. It was a Bristol firm with a very small London office and the origins of an international alliance.

‘Lots of firms have overtaken us,’ says the current managing partner Simon Beswick, ‘but really OC was the first regional firm to come into London and the first regional firm to go into Europe, doing both of those in 1987.’